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CLASS INCARCERATION

CLASS INCARCERATION


In North America, Club Fed is a term derisive for a prison whose accommodations are less severe than many other prisons. The 1999 movie Office Space made a reference to this style of prison by referring to it as a "white-collar, country club, pleasantentiary, minimum-security resort." As an example the Federal Correctional Institution in Cumberland, Maryland, has both medium- and minimum-security prisoners. Its visiting room is spotless and sprawling, with sparkling windows and walls that are decorated with quilts handmade by inmates. All of the Trump campaign supporters will go to a Federal country club just like Bernie Madoff or Dennis Kozlowski (the Tyco guy with the $6,000 shower curtain) or Martha Stewart or Mickey Sherman (the once hotshot defense lawyer) or any of the Wall Street types. The difference between these white collar criminals and Blue collar criminals are, white collar criminals are usually white and blue collar criminals are usually Black and are individuals from a lower social class as opposed to white-collar crime which is associated with crime committed by someone of a higher-level social class. It is class incarceration. The FBI and the American Association of Certified Fraud Examiners estimate financial losses from white-collar crimes to be between $300 and $600 billion per year. Blue collar crime is not as expensive, costing roughly $14 billion every year although there are other elements like a lost of life. The system is designed to separate class, race, and crime by prisons. My father was a white collar criminal he found himself in The Federal Correctional Institution, Terminal Island ( FCI Terminal Island) a low-security federal prison for male inmates in California. It's most notable was Al Capone held at FCI Terminal Island from 1939 to 1940.