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DID WHITE DOLLS REENGINEER BLACK CHILDREN'S MINDS LIKE MYSELF

DID WHITE DOLLS REENGINEER BLACK CHILDREN'S MINDS LIKE MYSELF


In the 20th century Black children like myself played with white dolls. Most Black parents bought them because they were cheap and plentiful. As a Black child I didn't know any better and I wasn't conscious of the act even living in a Black neighborhood. It was a toy and I played with it until the head came off. There is a citation by Bagby-Young, V. L. (2008). Mirror, mirror on the dresser, why are Black dolls still viewed as lesser? When Black children turn a blind face to their own race.

To me Black dolls in the 1960s weren't life revealing. They were not superheroes, doctors, police officers even in South Central LA in my community in the 1960s. They were not realistic. My mind in a short period of time was reengineered to believe that whites were special, better, smarter and even God. My first introduction to God was an image of a white man taught by a white man.

Black children like myself demonstrated a rejection of the mirrored images of themselves, in the form of dolls and drawings. My own drawings of people were white even my stick people because I believed that was the acceptable character for my white teachers.

This was all made possible because of the attitudes and experiences of my parent a woman from the south and my white teachers. So, what has it done to me know that I am an adult 57 years later. Even today I struggle with Black superheroes, and Black doctors because as a child starting at 3 years old in 1961 they were unheard of. I could have used a Pickaninny doll (also picaninny, piccaninny or pickinniny) in my life, a racial slur which refers to a depiction of a dark-skinned child of African descent and their Black dolls; I would have come out at least being self aware or scarred in a different way.