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DISSOCIATIVE IDENTITY DISORDER

DISSOCIATIVE IDENTITY DISORDER

Dissociative identity disorder, formerly referred to as multiple personality disorder, is a condition wherein a person's identity is fragmented into two distinct personality states. People with this condition are often victims of severe abuse. How does it relate to African Americans and how did many become associated with the disorder.

When Africans arrived on the shores of America as slaves they were introduced to a white God named Jesus. In order to relate to this God, African Americans adopted the name Christian a name God didn't ordained but was bestowed upon the slaves to maintain order on the plantations. Out of appeasement the African slave hide its real identity of Black warrior and accepted the name Christian being victims of severe abuse hoping it would dampen the beatings, and bring peace.

This alternate personality called Christian became the forefront of their character to never bring peace but intertwined with the real identity of African Americans that slowly died. African Americans original personality would take risks to free themselves from boundage, generate their own source of power and seek their own counsel until they became dependent Christians. African Americans have lived fragmented, living with two distinct personalities that refuse to compliment each other. One identity states that you are free and shaped by God and the other states you are a slave controlled by God. Even today the dual personalities will not agree with each other in the Black man. The Black character says more power and the Christian character says passive and for over 250 years the Black man's identity remain fragmented to the point he or she doesn't know which one has the power.