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JESUS'S CROSS WAS REUSED FOR THE NEXT CRIMINAL IT WAS UNUSUAL TO HAVE A MADE TO ORDER CROSS TO CARRY



The Romans executed most criminals by tying them to the wooden crosses, so it is highly unusual that Jesus was nailed although nails were used according to history. Those crosses on the hill of the skull called (Galgatha) were not made to order for each criminal and it was unlikely that a cross was made to order to fit Jesus's 5 foot 9 height and small frame. A Jewish priest wouldn't have constructed an item considered a curse. For Jesus to drag a new cross through the street was unusual it was like dragging an electric chair of the same possible weight. The only other reason for a new cross was the Hill's short supplies of execution platforms so they needed backups because the bodies of the condemned could remain on crosses for days. One legend describes a case in 213 C.E. in which a husband and wife lasted 10 days on the cross. By comparison, Jesus died remarkably quickly.

What happened to Jesus's cross and the two thieves crosses, do you think they were torn down and new ones built for a new criminal. That is far from the truth. Calvary, or Golgotha, was, according to the Gospels, a site immediately outside Jerusalem's walls where Jesus was crucified. Why would crosses be dragged all over Jerusalem for a criminal's execution parade.

So, let the story be told criminals were taken from the prisons around the city and walked to their own crucifixions with previously used and once dead, some were allowed to rot in

public, others were taken down and thrown to wild animals, under unusual circumstances was a criminal given a modest grave. Keep this in mind. Yes, wood is natural and biodegradable, but under the conditions created in landfills, wood takes longer to decompose—13 years for a standard wooden chair. A cross would not have been dismantled even if it was Jesus's cross because he wasn't that important to have his cross removed for posterity for all future generations of people.