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JUST A LITTLE PIECE OF THEIR SOUL THEY SOLD TO THE DEVIL FOR SUCCESS

JUST A LITTLE PIECE OF THEIR SOUL THEY SOLD TO THE DEVIL FOR SUCCESS

To sell your soul is signing a contract with the Devil, guaranteeing he can collect your soul after you die in exchange for some earthly favor, e.g., money, success, fame etc. which is either provided to you or perhaps the Devil choses to twist his word and give it to you in a way that you regret it. Naturally, you still have to honor your decision to give up your soul.

Selling your soul was a term usually used to identify gospel artists who desired to leave gospel music for the fame and fortune of R&B music. And for all of those who have questionable quick success in the R&B genre, or by using the R&B beats for gospel are identified in such manner because they have new found success without sweat and tears. They don't quite vacate their church upbringing but their decision making becomes more directed towards money and success. Seldom is the selling of the soul to the devil done by female gospel artists, they remain true to their gospel roots.

Historically it has been men selling their souls such as Sam Cooke, Little Richard, Billy Preston, Edwin Hawkins and Kirk Franklin by

by exploiting a certain sound only found in the R&B genre like "Oh Happy Day" by Edwin Hawkins that created a crossover appeal that can seamlessly settle in a nightclub music rotation, but it became an international hit in 1969, reaching No. 4 on the US Singles Chart, No. 1 in France, Germany, and the Netherlands and No. 2 on the Canadian Singles Chart, UK Singles Chart, and Irish Singles Chart.

Gospel artists do not entirely walk away from their roots of gospel music and certainly not Jesus but they settle for future monetary success indirectly by their behavior rather than a promissory note signing away their soul. It doesn't make them any less of being good Christians but wealthy singing Christians that the gospel music genre could not produce because it does not have the crossover appeal unless it incorporates an R&B beat like Kirk Franklin's and Detrick Haddon's music.