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NIGER IN THE BIBLE HAD THE SAME INTENT AS NIGGER

The Civil Writer Magazine

“Now in the church that was at Antioch there were certain prophets and teachers: Barnabas, Simeon who was (called) Niger, Lucius of Cyrene, Manaen who had been brought up with Herod the tetrarch, and Saul.” The etymology of the word Niger is Latin for (“black”), that likely influenced the modern day word nigger. Some sources give the term to Tuareg roots, deriving it from a claimed gher ngheren or egereou nigereouen (“river of rivers”). It's not “NYE-jur.” The French-sounding is “nee-ZHER,”

emphasizing the second syllable.”

Regardless of its etymology its intent was similar to the word nigger to identify a person from an Africa descent with a broader term rather than by their proper name. Even when proper names were used, they were "son(s) of". If you were a foreigner your assumed birth location was used to identify your ethnicity, (Doeg the Edomite of 1 Samuel 21:7). But if you were an Israelite your parentage was used (John and James, the sons of Zebedee in Matthew 10:2). (Judas the son of James in Luke 6:16). (Simon bar Jonah in John 1:42).

The word Niger occurs only once in the New Testament, namely in Acts 13:1. The nickname Niger means "black" and refers to a dark complexion or African descent, the same as nigger. This nickname in the New Testament signals some facts about the early New Testament church and some surprising implications of them being prejudice in their identification of obvious Black people but not Israelites. It is similar to Simeon being called Nigger because of his black skin. In the New

Testament, the word Ethiopia was used as the equivalent of the Old Testament word Cush. The Hebrew word, Cush in the Old Testament means black, and in the Septuagint it was translated Ethiopia, and that also means black. So why is Simeon significant in this story? Because of that description being used instead of Ethiopia or Cush or better yet his proper name Simeon

instead of "being called Niger." Simply a tongue-tied pronunciation away from nigger.

When John Rolfe recorded in his journal the first shipment of Africans to Virginia in 1619, he listed them as "negars."