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THE MAN WHO ADDED THE NEW NAME JESUS TO THE BIBLE

The Civil Writer Magazine

Benjamin Blayney (1728 – 20 September 1801) was an English divine and Hebraist, best known for his revision of the King James Version. He added the word Jesus to replace Iesous.

Blayney's 1769 revision produced the text that is used by most publishers of the KJV today. This 1769 update is the "Authorised Version" of the King James Bible of our time and use, and has remained the official Protestant "Canon" for over 240 years. It has been the source of all modern KJV Bible and was adopted by the American Bible Society. Matthew 1:1 (Benjamin Blaney of Oxford Version) The book of the generation of Jesus Christ, the son of David, the son of Abraham.

The word “Jesus” cannot be found in any document prior to 1610, when it was first found in a pleading associated with a lawsuit which sought to enjoin a corrupted publication of the bible, and which apparently attempted to use the word “Jesus” in place of the word of “Iesous.” Many people have set forth the challenge for historians to produce an older document, and to date, no one has done so. So, the name “Jesus” is 406 years old, and wasn’t used in the Biblical Lexicon until the 1769 Blaney version of the KJV, which for the most part, is still with us today.