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WAS "NIGGER LIPS" BABE RUTH BLACK 

The Civil Writer Magazine

George Herman "Babe" Ruth Jr. was an American professional baseball player whose career in Major League Baseball spanned 22 seasons, from 1914 through 1935. Born: February 6, 1895, Pigtown, Baltimore, MD Died: August 16, 1948, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center.

If Babe Ruth wasn't Black he was treated as if he was. During Ruth's career, he was the target of intense press and public attention for his baseball exploits and off-field penchants for drinking and womanizing. After his retirement as a player, he was denied the opportunity to manage a major league club, most likely due to poor behavior during parts of his playing career. Baseball historians often contemplate why a player of Babe Ruth’s mythical caliber was passed over for managerial jobs he seemed like a perfect fit for. The greatest player ever was actually “blackballed” from managing, because of what his daughter says, was the fear that he would bring in black players, years before Jackie Robinson broke the color barrier in 1947. "Daddy would have had blacks on his team," She said. "Definitely.”

Ruth's parents, Katherine (née Schamberger) and George Herman Ruth Sr., were both of German ancestry. According to the 1880 census, his parents were born in Maryland. His paternal grandparents were from Prussia and Hanover. Something is up somebody got into the family tree on one of the branches when it comes to Babe Ruth's features. Ruth's nickname was "Niggerlips", as he had large facial features including lips and nose and was darker than most boys at the all-white reformatory. The boys incarcerated along with him called him Nigger Lips.

An author of a book on Babe Ruth stated, "one of the greatest areas of interest centers on how the Babe interacted with the African-American community. In this matter, modern fans perceive Ruth inaccurately in two ways. First, they believe that he did not compete against the best Black players of that era. Second, most think that he did not enjoy a positive relationship with the general African-American population." Which would have been odd him coming from Baltimore Maryland. Ruth was known to frequent New York City’s Cotton Club and befriended black athletes and celebrities. He once brought Bill Robinson, a tap-dancer and actor known as Bojangles, into the Yankees’ clubhouse.